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Ladies peeing outdoors

From female urinals for festivals to pissoirs on the streets of Paris , here are six of the freshest outdoor urinals designs for peeing in the fresh air. P-tree by Aandeboom. When revellers at the Roskilde Festival in Denmark refused to stop peeing against the trees, Dutch design studio Aandeboom came up with an ingenious solution. P-tree is a bright orange plastic urinal that can be mounted on trees, but protects them from the damaging effects of human urine. Pipes connected to the urinal can be hooked up to the main sewer system or funnelled into a tank. Launched at this year's Roskilde Festival, Lapee is a urinal that's bringing gender equality to the outdoor loo queue. Made from industrial-strength plastic, Lapee is a door-free place to pee that three women can use at once. Screened by the curving form of the unit, the urinals are stepped up so a squatting woman is at eye-level with any passersby, making it safer than a normal toilet but still private. Uritrottoir by Faltazi. These urinals caused uproar when they were installed on the streets of Paris.
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When we were offered press passes to yet another outdoor festival, we seriously weighed the pros and cons. Of course, one thing you can always count on is that going to the bathroom will be a terrible, nightmarish experience. Especially for girls. It's sad that something as natural and beautiful as the act of urination becomes an inconvenience to females, especially someplace where everyone is drinking a lot and that shit becomes inevitable. Consider the following. When a Porta Potty presents itself, make good use out of it. And by "the wild", I mostly just mean parking lots, alleyways, ditches, bus stops, banks and pretty much every place where guys are frequent to release. The myth that girls can't pee outside is obviously false. There is nothing biologically disabling about female urinary anatomy when it comes to the art of pissing outside — girls and boys just do it differently. Look for well-protected areas that aren't too far off the beaten path.

But privacy is an issue, and so is snow. I don't mind squatting, but then I don't have knee issues. For me, the biggest problem is lack of washing facilities near my favorite bushes. Unfortunately, for women, drip drying is just not a great option, as you eventually start to smell like a substandard nursing home. I refuse to leave bits of toilet paper lying around, even buried. And I really don't want to carry used toilet paper back to a collecting receptacle, where it can develop a fine, nasty aroma before said receptacle is emptied. I am thinking of carrying a jar of water with me as I depart for the thickets, but haven't actually tried it out yet. Should work It's never too late to start! I retired to homestead on the slopes of Mauna Loa, an active volcano.

From female urinals for festivals to pissoirs on the streets of Paris , here are six of the freshest outdoor urinals designs for peeing in the fresh air. P-tree by Aandeboom. When revellers at the Roskilde Festival in Denmark refused to stop peeing against the trees, Dutch design studio Aandeboom came up with an ingenious solution. P-tree is a bright orange plastic urinal that can be mounted on trees, but protects them from the damaging effects of human urine. Pipes connected to the urinal can be hooked up to the main sewer system or funnelled into a tank.

Launched at this year's Roskilde Festival, Lapee is a urinal that's bringing gender equality to the outdoor loo queue. Made from industrial-strength plastic, Lapee is a door-free place to pee that three women can use at once. Screened by the curving form of the unit, the urinals are stepped up so a squatting woman is at eye-level with any passersby, making it safer than a normal toilet but still private. Uritrottoir by Faltazi. These urinals caused uproar when they were installed on the streets of Paris.

A portmanteau of the French words for pavement and urinal, French design studio Faltazi gave the Uritrottoir a bright red upper section topped by a box planted with greenery.

Users pee into the opening, and the urine is absorbed by the woodchips, straw or sawdust that's placed inside. This mix is periodically removed and mulched down into compost, which is then returned to nurture the plants that grow out of the top of the Uritrottoir.

Copenhagen-based studio UiWE designed four back-to-back troughs for women to stand over and pee touch-free. The shared core is separated by fold-out screens for privacy, and handles allow people to squat and pee in the open air without touching any part of the urinal.

Fountain by Bureau A. Part art-installation, part practical-intervention, Fountain is a pink marble pissoir that was installed in a car park in Zurich. Made from imported marble resting on a wooden frame, the urinal references classical fountains.

Liquid collects in a channel at the base, which pours it out into a pothole filled with gravel and plants. After dark, a neon light serves as an invitation for passersby who might be caught short at night. L'Uritonnoir by Faltazi. Another Faltazi design, this time for urinals that can be set up in a field. L'Uritonnoir — a cross between urinal and the French for funnel — can be slotted into the side of a bale of straw and fastened there with a strap. The urine collects in the bale, and the nitrogen reacts with the carbon in the straw to set off the process of decomposition.

After use, the bale can be composted or simply left in-situ for a year to break down into compost. Dezeen Weekly is a curated newsletter that is sent every Thursday, containing highlights from Dezeen. Dezeen Weekly subscribers will also receive occasional updates about events, competitions and breaking news.

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